The Once In A Century Solar Eclipse

Seems everyone is getting very excited for the coming complete solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st at 2:45 PM. The New Haven area is almost 640 miles from seeing the total eclipse, so you better plan on a crowded trip down to South Carolina if you want to see the sun totally blocked out. Our area will be almost 70% blocked out at the height of the eclipse. Do you want to see the eclipse?

DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY INTO THE SUN…. even during an eclipse!

Here are a few tips we gathered from NASA as to how to look at an eclipse.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon blocks any part of the sun. On Monday, August 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible (weather permitting) across all of North America. The whole continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through the event, anyone within a roughly 70-mile-wide path from Oregon to South Carolina will experience a brief total eclipse, when the moon completely blocks the sun’s bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds, turning day into night and making visible the otherwise hidden solar corona — the sun’s outer atmosphere — one of nature’s most awesome sights. Bright stars and planets will become visible as well.

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” (example shown at left) or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. To date five manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: American Paper Optics, Baader Planetarium (AstroSolar Silver/Gold film only), Rainbow Symphony, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

  • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After glancing at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.
  • If you are within the path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe(link is external)), remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

Want to see what the eclipse will look like from your zip code? Click this great link from Vox.

2017-08-08T10:46:36-05:00August 14th, 2017|Fun facts, Safety, Trivia|0 Comments

Eye See Sharks

As we approach Shark Week next week, did you know that shark corneas are very similar to the ones we humans have? As such, shark corneas have been used as replacements in human eye surgeries. Want to see Shark Week in all its gory glory? Check out some new lenses at Kennedy & Perkins today.

 

2017-06-26T16:29:16-05:00July 18th, 2017|Fun facts|0 Comments

May is Healthy Vision Month

the finest eye exams in Connecticut - Kennedy & Perkins In 2003, the National Eye Institute established May as Healthy Vision Month. During this annual observance, Americans are encouraged to make their eye health a priority and learn how to keep their eyes healthy and safe. Why is Healthy Vision Month important? Healthy Vision Month is important because more than 23 million Americans age 18 and older have never had an eye exam, according to a national survey conducted by National Eye Institute. The reason: Most say they don’t think they have an eye problem. In fact: Many eye diseases don’t have symptoms in their early stages, so without an eye exam, they can’t know. And there are worrying predictions: By 2030, 11.4 million people will have diabetic retinopathy, 4.2 million will have glaucoma, and 3.7 million will have age-related macular degeneration. Healthy Vision Month encourages people to take steps to protect their sight. So during May (and quite frankly every month of the year), we encourage you to follow these five simple suggestions:

  • Live a Healthy Lifestyle: Maintain a healthy weight and eat foods like fish and dark leafy green vegetables to lower your risk of eye disease. And don’t smoke—it’s as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body.
  • Know Your Family History: Genetics are a factor in eye disease, including diseases that are the leading causes of blindness. Talk to your family members about their eye health history.
  • Use Protective Eyewear: Safety glasses or goggles can protect your eyes at work and at play. Talk to us about the right protective eyewear for your sport or job.
  • Wear Sunglasses: Protect your eyes by choosing sunglasses that block out 99 to 100% of both UVA and UVB radiation.
  • Get a Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exam: It’s the best way to know if your eyes are healthy and you’re seeing your best. Schedule an exam with us today!
2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00May 9th, 2017|Exams, Fun facts|0 Comments

It’s All In The Eyes

Having a regular comprehensive eye exam can do more than just test your vision. Yes, getting the right prescription can help you see better no matter the distance, no matter the time of day. However, did you know that there are many health problems than can be detected by an eye exam much sooner than most medical exams? Our friends at All About Vision have created this infographic sharing just some of the health problems that can be detected with a thorough eye exam. Ready to schedule your eye exam? Click here and let us help.

2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00April 12th, 2017|Conditions, Exams, Fun facts|0 Comments

Cantaloupe…Another treat for your eyes

eat healthy and get your eyes examined at Kennedy & Perkins

The pools may be closed for the year, but farm fresh fruits are still abundant in farmer’s markets and grocery shelves. One of our favorites is cantaloupe, and wouldn’t you know it, cantaloupe has so many wonderful properties to it, including for your eyes.

Cantaloupes have been the subject of many studies, some of which suggest consumption can actually decrease your risk of obesity while increasing energy levels. Cantaloupe consumption has been known to support heart health, decreasing blood pressure, reducing the risk of strokes, and protecting the body from loss of muscle mass. It can even help reduce the formation of kidney stones.

Being in the optical business, we are most excited by the reports that eating cantaloupe can decrease our risk and the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Cantaloupes contain the anti-oxidant, zeaxanthin, which has been found to naturally filter out harmful blue light rays, protecting our eyes.

So, head on down to your favorite grocer and pick up some farm-fresh local cantaloupe today. Your taste buds, your body, and your eyes will thank you!

2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00September 7th, 2016|Conditions, Fun facts|0 Comments

Different Color Eye Day

Today is certainly not one of the biggest holidays you will celebrate all summer, but in the eye care community, today is Different Color Eye Day. People like Mila Kunis, Kate Bosworth, Benedict Cumberbatch, Robert Downey Jr, and Christopher Walken are known for having noticeably different colored eyes.

The technical term for having different colored eyes are heterochromia iridis or heterochromia iridum. Hetero mean “different”, chromia means “colors”,  and iridis or more technically iridium refers to the iris of the eye, or the thin colored circular structure that surrounds the iris and contains the melanin that gives our eyes our distinctive color.  

border-collie-heterochromia

Heterochromia is usually benign or without any disease and does not affect your vision. It is generally considered very exotic. Heterochromia also occurs in animals, such as angora cats, Siberian huskies, or border collies.

In some cases Heterochromia is a symptom of another condition such as Horner’s syndrome. If your eyes have recently changed colors, schedule an appointment and let us give you a thorough eye exam.

2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00July 12th, 2016|Conditions, Fun facts|0 Comments

Eye See Omega 3’s

Omega 3 fatty acids are important for eye health as they can decrease the risk of age-related macular degeneration and are also therapeutic for patients with dry eye syndrome. Where do we get Omega 3’s? For most of us, we find all the Omega 3 our body can use in fish and fish oil. Since summer is a great time for fresh fish, we thought it important to remind you to fill your summer (and your tummy) with lots of great fresh fish.

fish-Omega3-for-your-eyes

 

Want another way to get Omega 3’s? To get the same amount of Omega 3 that you would get form 1 fillet of salmon you would need to eat a dozen eggs.  Omega 3 eggs are a great eye food however; they don’t replace fish in the diet. Eating 2 servings of wild salmon (Alaska) per week and 2 servings of other cold-water fish will provide your body with an omega-3 intake equivalent to 850 mg of DHA and EPA per day. By comparison one omega-3 egg contains approximately 125mg of DHA (omega-3 fatty acids).  Although they are not a replacement for DHA and EPA in fish, eggs are a great source of other eye nutrients such as lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin E and zinc.

2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00June 20th, 2016|Fun facts|0 Comments

K&P sets our sights on Maui Jim

One of our all time favorite sunglass brand names is Maui Jim. Born on the Hawaiian islands, Maui Jim continues to be one of the most innovative designers of sunglasses in the world with something for everyone. A number of the Kennedy & Perkins staff just spent the last two days at the mainland headquarters for Maui Jim in Peoria, Illinois to see the state of the art manufacturing facilities for ourselves.  We learned a lot and are bringing back both that knowledge and some great new  styles and designs from Maui Jim to our Connecticut friends and neighbors.

IMG_2212

 

IMG_2529b

 

IMG_2220

 

IMG_2218

 

IMG_2243

 

 

IMG_2248

2017-05-22T10:56:39-05:00May 5th, 2016|Fun facts, Sunglasses|0 Comments
Load More Posts